Wednesday, May 6, 2009

A Tale of Woe!


Last night before bed I posted the comment about Sea Trout fishing in the evening and I mentioned a fly that was producing well. I just happened to look down at previous posts and noted the article Jay wrote about our preoccupation with tying streamers. Getting hooks right is always a concern and I though to myself I wish a I'd brought along some Gamagusu hooks. The fly was tied on a Dai-Riki #930 saltwater hook in a size 4.

This morning I hit the beach for Snook. I wasn't expecting much the wind was blowing and the surf was a choppy. I decided to leave the fly on from the previous night. Maybe the sea trout would still be interested. For an hour I caught nothing but small Jacks and a couple of Lady Fish. I made a 70 foot cast identical to previous hundred or so when the rod was almost jerked from my hand. No way this could be a Snook. It had to be a King Mackerel that wandered in close to shore. He peeled off 75 yards of backing and with considerable pressure I turned him towards the beach. At 60 feet I saw his silhouette in a wave and he broke the surface with a lunge. It was far and away the largest Snook I've ever hooked. She (the females are the larger fish) had to be over 40 inches and maybe 18 pounds or more. Every time I got her close to the beach she took off. After 10 minutes I got concerned that the hook might work itself loose or she would break the 20-pound bite tippet off on the rocks or by cutting it with her gill plate.

By this time a crowd had gathered to watch the fight. I though to myself 'great no one is ever around when I catch a nice fish and this time I can get someone to take a picture'. Moments later and 10 feet from shore the hook straighten and she as gone! I'll never know but I'm guessing I would have landed this fish if I had been using a better hook!

2 comments:

  1. Great story. Which part of Florida were you fishing.

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  2. I'm on Sanibel Island....the Snook are off the beaches and we're seeing Tarpon almost every day with water temps moving into the high 70's

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